Arcinspiration

A collection of inspiring architectural projects, materials, technologies, design ideas and philosophies

Search

More liked posts

Once Building by Adamo-Faiden

Once Building by Adamo-Faiden

Argentinian architects Adamo-Faiden have completed a building in Buenos Aires that could either be used for offices or apartments.

Once Building by Adamo-Faiden

The building contains six basic modular units that the architects claim would comfortably suit both possible uses, each featuring floor-to-ceiling heights of just over three metres.

Once Building by Adamo-Faiden

Recessed balconies span both the front and back of the building and are filled with plants to help shade the interior spaces.

The building is situated in Núñez, a neighborhood whose development brings a balanced densification to the city of Buenos Aires. Its peripheral condition and efficient connectivity with the rest of the city turns it today into a desirable alternative for residential and tertiary programmes.

Once Building by Adamo-Faiden

The building incorporates to its own organization this notion of mixed city through the construction of six spaces, which are programmatically undetermined but spatially specific, understanding that a path to the intensification of the inhabitating opens from this apparent contradiction.


OWEN by Tacklebox

OWEN by Tacklebox

Twenty-five thousand brown paper lunch bags line the wall and ceiling of OWEN, a new fashion boutique in New York’s Meatpacking District by Jeremy Barbour of Brooklyn architects Tacklebox.

OWEN by Tacklebox

The bags create a honeycomb effect in the 170 square-metre store, located in a former industrial building at 809 Washington Street.

OWEN, established by fashion graduate Phillip Salem, stocks items by established and emerging designers and aims to give customers the kind of personal service usually reserved for celebrities.

OWEN by Tacklebox

Apparently it took nine days to staple all 25,000 bags to the store’s wall and soffit.

OWEN by Tacklebox


House T by Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects

House T by Hiroyuki Shinozaki

There are huge rectangular holes in the walls and floors of this Tokyo house by Japanese studio Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects.

House T by Hiroyuki Shinozaki

Wooden ladders connect each of the four split-level storeys and a staircase with built-in storage leads up from the ground floor studio to the dining room and kitchen on the staggered floor above.

House T by Hiroyuki Shinozaki

One ladder travels up from the dining room to the living room, which then steps down to the bedroom through the wide hole in the wall.

House T by Hiroyuki Shinozaki

Another ladder connects the living room with the skeletal top level, where four holes in the floor give the room a cross-shaped layout.

House T by Hiroyuki Shinozaki

A small study area is sunken into one of these holes and residents use the floor above it as a desk.

House T by Hiroyuki Shinozaki

Lamps of different lengths also hang through the holes and a final ladder leads up to a terrace on the roof.

House T by Hiroyuki Shinozaki

House T by Hiroyuki Shinozaki

House T by Hiroyuki Shinozaki

House T by Hiroyuki Shinozaki

House T by Hiroyuki Shinozaki


Vennesla Library and Cultural Centre by Helen & Hard Architects

Vennesla Library and Cultural Centre by Helen & Hard Architects

Chunky wooden ribs bend around the walls and ceiling of this library in Norway by Helen & Hard Architects and integrate lighting, bookshelves and seating.

Vennesla Library and Cultural Centre by Helen & Hard Architects

The 27 ribs frame the outline of a double-height hall, which spans the length of the Vennesla Library and Cultural Centre and includes a mezzanine.

Vennesla Library and Cultural Centre by Helen & Hard Architects

Glue-laminated timber beams and columns provide the structure for each rib, while air conditioning ducts are sandwiched behind the lighting fixtures and plywood casing.

Vennesla Library and Cultural Centre by Helen & Hard Architects

As the columns wrap around to meet the floor, hollows lined with cushions provide sheltered study spaces.

Vennesla Library and Cultural Centre by Helen & Hard Architects

Existing buildings are located either side of the library, but natural light floods in through glazed facades that are exposed at the front and shaded behind timber slats at the back.

Vennesla Library and Cultural Centre by Helen & Hard Architects

Stairs lead down to a basement floor containing offices, classrooms and a local history collection.

Vennesla Library and Cultural Centre by Helen & Hard Architects

Vennesla Library and Cultural Centre by Helen & Hard Architects

Vennesla Library and Cultural Centre by Helen & Hard Architects



Mecenat Art Museum / naf architect & design

The name of the client is Mr. Kanji KATO who owns a dental clinic in Higashi Hiroshima city and studies Japanese-style painting as a hobby.  His teacher is Mr. Kakudo GOAMI, a Japanese-style painter and a honorary president of Hiroshima Japanese-style painting Association, who has received numerous awards.  Mr. KATO had been planning a museum of Kakudo GOAMI with the hope of exhibiting the works of Mr. GOAMI to a greater public.  Mr. KATO had seen my project, FLAT FORM, a commercial complex built several years ago, and considered that I was a optimal candidate for the architect of the museum.

This is a museum funded and owned personally by Mr. KATO, but anyone can come and see. All the works exhibited there are those of Mr. Kakudo GOAMI, owned either by the artist himself or Mr. KATO, thus, many of which had not been exhibited in public museums.

The works of Mr. GOAMI give striking image of various lights, thus, I decided to design the building focusing on natural light.  Soft diffused light from top light, direct light pouring  from top light through white cylinder for condensation of light spreading on the first floor, soft light from slits on the walls reflecting on the exterior green, fragments of graphical lights pouring through 432 plate glasses on the concrete walls; the space is filled with various kinds of lights.  As an exhibition space, there was no need for structure such as columns and beams but as large wall as possible.  The important factor of the museum was to incorporate natural light and wind, so corners are sliced with slits to the extent which would not interfere the exhibit.  This idea would have left the building structurally fragile, so we studied a rational shape, which was structurally stable like folding one sheet of paper, origami, many time to make several corners, with models and three-dimensional structure analysis by computer.

The site is found in a calm and peaceful rural scene, where it became completely dark at night with no streetlights.  This building is automatically lit up when it becomes dark, softly casting light to the surrounding.  It became a landmark of the area.  

I would like the visitors to feel, with their entire bodies, through this building, atmosphere of profundity and gentleness created by the paintings of Mr. Kakudo GOAMI, which is based on noble spirit of Orient in the changes of four seasons unique in Japan.


Life in spiral / Hideaki Takayanagi

The main concept is “A Spiral Porch in tokyo” -challenging to open (or close) the privacy to urban environment. The “Porch” was essential to traditional Japanese house, therefore it is one of the most nostalgic space for all. Recently in Tokyo(JPN), lands for build some architecture are very expensive. And therefore that made us give up to create the “porch”.

So we decided to create the brand-new Engawa. Very narrow site forced to form 3-dimensional (spiral shaped) engawa structure. But this was a nice idea to create engawa outside of this ribbon. The ribbon makes shade and shadow in inside and outside. And each floor slabs, spirals, end roof are entirely made from steel plate T=4.5mm. So this house is very light weight to be supple for earthquake. No thick columns needed, all parts configure supple and strong mono-coque body.

Life in spiral / Hideaki Takayanagi © Takumi Ota

Life in spiral / Hideaki Takayanagi © Takumi Ota

Life in spiral / Hideaki Takayanagi © Takumi Ota

Reykjavik House by Moomoo Architects (PL)

A Polish architectural practice Moomoo Architects have completed this single-storey minimalist house located in the Icelandic capital of Reykjavik. Uniformly white, the detached development features two fully-glazed walls and a terrace wall ‘which was pulled from the house and bended in a way that it looks like it came out from the landscape.’

‘The project of the house should fit within the border lines of the local master plan which was established for the chosen plot. Consequently the exterior building dimensions including terraces and roofing are 15,5m x 17m which is the maximum area that can be achieved in the plot. The main idea of the project is terrace wall which was pulled from the house and bended in a way that it looks like it came out from the landscape.

‘The glazings on the both sides of the house are sliding, so during the warmer season they can be folded, so the terrace makes the continuation of the area of the house. This manipulation of the shape of the house blur the border between the house and the surrounding area. While the exterior is plain white, the interior has an accents of birch wood. The plan divides the house into 4 main zones – garage area, master bedroom area, children area and living area.’

227 Flat by OODA

227 Flat by OODA

A suspended net provides a hammock over the staircase of this apartment in Porto by architects OODA

227 Flat by OODA

Residents can climb onto the net from a top-floor landing and there’s room for a couple of people to sit down at once.

227 Flat by OODA

Sliding glass doors on one side of the hammock open out to a terrace with a view out to sea.

227 Flat by OODA

The architects installed the net during a renovation of the whole two-storey apartment and have also added wooden floors in each room.

227 Flat by OODA

227 Flat by OODA


Pierres Vives by Zaha Hadid

Zaha Hadid has completed a streamlined concrete and glass building for three government departments in Montpellier, France 

Pierres Vives by Zaha Hadid

The Pierres Vives Building will accommodate the multimedia library, public archive and sports department of the Herault regional government and is due to be inaugurated on 13 September.

Pierres Vives by Zaha Hadid

A recessed section of green-tinted glass runs along the length of the facade, where a first-floor foyer connects the library and offices with shared facilities that include meeting rooms, an auditorium and an exhibition space.

Pierres Vives by Zaha Hadid

These shared facilities are contained inside a curved concrete block, which bursts through the glazing to shelter the main entrance on the ground floor below.

Pierres Vives by Zaha Hadid

Pierres Vives by Zaha Hadid

Pierres Vives by Zaha Hadid

Pierres Vives by Zaha Hadid

Pierres Vives by Zaha Hadid


Memento by Wesley Meuris

Memento by Wesley Meuris

Narrow slits provide entrances to this circular pavilion by Belgian artist Wesley Meuris outside the Flemish town of Borgloon.

Memento by Wesley Meuris

Called Memento, the white structure has a smooth exterior and a tiled interior.

The square tiles are in relief, creating different textures and shadows as the sun moves across the sky.

Memento by Wesley Meuris

The two slender gaps cast sundial-like shadows around the circle and allow the evening sun to stream in.

Memento by Wesley Meuris

Situated on a slope, the pavilion looks out over the central graveyard in the medieval town of Borgloon.

Memento by Wesley Meuri

The project is one in a series of permanent structures for public spaces in the Haspengouw region, instigated by the Z33 gallery.

Memento by Wesley Meuris

Memento by Wesley Meuris

Memento by Wesley Meuris

Memento by Wesley Meuris

Memento by Wesley Meuris


Loading posts...